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america-wakiewakie:


10 Big Companies That Pay No Taxes (and Their Favorite Politicians) | Mother Jones
Between 2008 and 2011, 26 major American corporations paid no net federal income taxes despite bringing in billions in profits, according to a new report (PDF) from the nonprofit research group Citizens for Tax Justice. CTJ calculates that if the companies had paid the full 35 percent corporate tax rate, they would have put more than $78 billion into government coffers.
Here’s a look at the 10 most profitable tax evaders and the politicians their CEOs, employees, and PACs give the most money to.
Verizon CommunicationsProfits: $19.8 billion    Effective tax rate: -3.8%Top recipients, 2011-2012President Barack Obama: $51,493Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.): $24,450Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.): $23,700Rep. John Boehner (R-Ohio): $22,500Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.): $15,000
General Electric Profits: $19.6 billion    Effective tax rate: -18.9%Top recipients, 2011-2012Mitt Romney: $53,750President Barack Obama (D): $30,493Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.): $23,900Rep. Howard Berman (D-Calif.): $21,860Rep. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.): $19,750


BoeingProfits: $14.8 billion    Effective tax rate: -5.5%Top recipients, 2011-2012Rep. Buck McKeon (R-Calif.): $31,750Rep. Adam Smith (D-Wash.): $25,000Former Sen. George Allen (R-Va.): $23,500Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.): $23,125Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas): $20,986
NextEra Energy: North America’s largest solar and wind power operator, based in FloridaProfits: $8.8 billion    Effective tax rate: -2%Top recipients, 2011-2012George LeMieux (R-Fla.): $9,500Mike Haridopolos (R-Fla.): $4,800Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.): $2,000Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas): $2,000Rep. Tom Rooney (R-Fla.): $2,000
American Electric Power: Electric utility based in Columbus, OhioProfits: $8.2 billion    Effective tax rate: -6.4%Top recipients, 2011-2012Rep. John Boehner (R-Ohio): $34,750Rep. Steve Stivers (R-Ohio): $34,050Rep. Bob Gibbs (R-Ohio): $21,700Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W. Va.): $19,750Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio): $18,450
Pacific Gas & Electric: California electrical utilityProfits: $6 billion    Effective tax rate: -8.4%Top recipients, 2011-2012President Barack Obama (D): $6,250Rep. Jim Costa (D-Calif.): $5,000Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.): $5,500Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.): $5,000Rep. Jeff Denham (R-Calif.): $3,500
Apache: Houston-based oil and gas companyProfits: $6 billion    Effective tax rate: -0.3%Top recipients, 2011-2012David Dewhurst (R-Texas): $25,000Rep. Connie Mack (R-Fla.): $5,000Rep. Bill Cassidy (R-La.): $2,500 Rep. Mike Conaway (R-Texas): $2,500Rep. Gene Green (D-Texas): $2,500Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.): $2,500Brendan Doherty (R-R.I.): $2,500
Consolidated Edison: New York energy companyProfits: $5.9 billion    Effective tax rate: -1.3%Top recipients, 2011-2012Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.): $15,050Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.): $8,000Rep. Edolphus Towns (D-N.Y.): $6,650Then-Rep. David Wu (D-Ore.): $2,500Rep. Joseph Crowley (D-N.Y.): $1,500Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.): $1,500Rep. Jose Serrano (D-N.Y.): $1,500
El Paso: Houston-based energy company that operates the country’s largest natural gas pipelineProfits: $4.6 billion    Effective tax rate: -0.9%Top recipients, 2011-2012David Dewhurst (R-Texas): $7,500Mitt Romney (R): $5,000Rep. John Barrow (D-Ga.): $3,000Rep. Diane Black (R-Tenn.): $2,750Sen. John Barrasso (R-Wyo.): $2,500 Sen. Max Baucus (D-Mont.): $2,500 Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.): $2,500 Gov. Rick Perry (R-Texas): $2,500Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.): $2,500Sen. Roger Wicker (R-Miss.): $2,500
CenterPoint Energy: Electric and gas utility company based in HoustonProfits: $3.1 billion    Effective tax rate: -11.3%Top recipients, 2011-2012David Dewhurst (R-Texas): $22,050Gov. Rick Perry (R-Texas): $13,458Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.): $10,299Rep. Greg Walden (R-Ore.): $7,000Rep. Kevin Brady (R-Texas): $4,000
Giving data from the Center for Responsive Politics. Includes all 2011-12 campaign donations from each company’s employees and corporate PACs.
(Photo Credit: JD Hancock/Flickr)

america-wakiewakie:

10 Big Companies That Pay No Taxes (and Their Favorite Politicians) | Mother Jones

Between 2008 and 2011, 26 major American corporations paid no net federal income taxes despite bringing in billions in profits, according to a new report (PDF) from the nonprofit research group Citizens for Tax Justice. CTJ calculates that if the companies had paid the full 35 percent corporate tax rate, they would have put more than $78 billion into government coffers.

Here’s a look at the 10 most profitable tax evaders and the politicians their CEOs, employees, and PACs give the most money to.

Verizon Communications
Profits: $19.8 billion    Effective tax rate: -3.8%

Top recipients, 2011-2012
President Barack Obama: $51,493
Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.): $24,450
Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.): $23,700
Rep. John Boehner (R-Ohio): $22,500
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.): $15,000

General Electric 
Profits: $19.6 billion    Effective tax rate: -18.9%

Top recipients, 2011-2012
Mitt Romney: $53,750
President Barack Obama (D): $30,493
Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.): $23,900
Rep. Howard Berman (D-Calif.): $21,860
Rep. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.): $19,750

Boeing
Profits: $14.8 billion    Effective tax rate: -5.5%
Top recipients, 2011-2012
Rep. Buck McKeon (R-Calif.): $31,750
Rep. Adam Smith (D-Wash.): $25,000
Former Sen. George Allen (R-Va.): $23,500
Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.): $23,125
Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas): $20,986

NextEra Energy: North America’s largest solar and wind power operator, based in Florida
Profits: $8.8 billion    Effective tax rate: -2%
Top recipients, 2011-2012
George LeMieux (R-Fla.): $9,500
Mike Haridopolos (R-Fla.): $4,800
Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.): $2,000
Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas): $2,000
Rep. Tom Rooney (R-Fla.): $2,000

American Electric Power: Electric utility based in Columbus, Ohio
Profits: $8.2 billion    Effective tax rate: -6.4%
Top recipients, 2011-2012
Rep. John Boehner (R-Ohio): $34,750
Rep. Steve Stivers (R-Ohio): $34,050
Rep. Bob Gibbs (R-Ohio): $21,700
Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W. Va.): $19,750
Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio): $18,450

Pacific Gas & Electric: California electrical utility
Profits: $6 billion    Effective tax rate: -8.4%
Top recipients, 2011-2012
President Barack Obama (D): $6,250
Rep. Jim Costa (D-Calif.): $5,000
Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.): $5,500
Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.): $5,000
Rep. Jeff Denham (R-Calif.): $3,500

Apache: Houston-based oil and gas company
Profits: $6 billion    Effective tax rate: -0.3%
Top recipients, 2011-2012
David Dewhurst (R-Texas): $25,000
Rep. Connie Mack (R-Fla.): $5,000
Rep. Bill Cassidy (R-La.): $2,500 
Rep. Mike Conaway (R-Texas): $2,500
Rep. Gene Green (D-Texas): $2,500
Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.): $2,500
Brendan Doherty (R-R.I.): $2,500

Consolidated Edison: New York energy company
Profits: $5.9 billion    Effective tax rate: -1.3%
Top recipients, 2011-2012
Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.): $15,050
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.): $8,000
Rep. Edolphus Towns (D-N.Y.): $6,650
Then-Rep. David Wu (D-Ore.): $2,500
Rep. Joseph Crowley (D-N.Y.): $1,500
Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.): $1,500
Rep. Jose Serrano (D-N.Y.): $1,500

El Paso: Houston-based energy company that operates the country’s largest natural gas pipeline
Profits: $4.6 billion    Effective tax rate: -0.9%
Top recipients, 2011-2012
David Dewhurst (R-Texas): $7,500
Mitt Romney (R): $5,000
Rep. John Barrow (D-Ga.): $3,000
Rep. Diane Black (R-Tenn.): $2,750
Sen. John Barrasso (R-Wyo.): $2,500 
Sen. Max Baucus (D-Mont.): $2,500 
Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.): $2,500 
Gov. Rick Perry (R-Texas): $2,500
Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.): $2,500
Sen. Roger Wicker (R-Miss.): $2,500

CenterPoint Energy: Electric and gas utility company based in Houston
Profits: $3.1 billion    Effective tax rate: -11.3%
Top recipients, 2011-2012
David Dewhurst (R-Texas): $22,050
Gov. Rick Perry (R-Texas): $13,458
Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.): $10,299
Rep. Greg Walden (R-Ore.): $7,000
Rep. Kevin Brady (R-Texas): $4,000

Giving data from the Center for Responsive Politics. Includes all 2011-12 campaign donations from each company’s employees and corporate PACs.

(Photo Credit: JD Hancock/Flickr)

9 hours ago
318 notes
If they [Negro Americans] were citizens, you wouldn’t have a race problem. If the Emancipation Proclamation was authentic, you wouldn’t have a race problem. If the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments to the Constitution were authentic, you wouldn’t have a race problem. If the Supreme Court desegregation decision was authentic, you wouldn’t have a race problem. All of this hypocrisy that has been practiced by the so-called white so-called liberal for the past four hundred years that compounds the problem, makes it more complicated, instead of eliminating the problem.

Malcolm X

The faux post-racialism of white liberals is as detrimental to dismantling racism as the so called “colorblind” conservative. Both self-insulate like an ostrich’s head in the sand, while both reap the benefits of privilege and its institutionalized oppression. It seems to me that white people point in true monolithic fashion at the abolition of slavery, the Civil Rights acts, and now Obama’s election, as the end of struggle, as if laws ever rectified injustice or elections brought about liberation.

(via america-wakiewakie)
9 hours ago
213 notes
rs620:

"Being black is not a crime." South Sudanese and Eritrean refugees protest against prosecution in Tel Aviv, Israel 

rs620:

"Being black is not a crime." South Sudanese and Eritrean refugees protest against prosecution in Tel Aviv, Israel 

(via america-wakiewakie)

9 hours ago
3,275 notes

nitanahkohe:

U.S. attorneys declined 50 percent of the Native American cases deferred to them between 2005 and 2009, of which 67 percent were sexual abuse and rape related, according to the Native American Bar Association. [source]

(via america-wakiewakie)

9 hours ago
1,821 notes
wikihow:

Coke. It tastes delicious, causes Super Bowl controversy, and can clean toilets! Learn how! http://www.wikihow.com/Clean-a-Toilet-With-Coke

wikihow:

Coke. It tastes delicious, causes Super Bowl controversy, and can clean toilets! Learn how! 
http://www.wikihow.com/Clean-a-Toilet-With-Coke

10 hours ago
57 notes
playboydreamz:

RULE #1 SCARY BITCH 101

playboydreamz:

RULE #1 SCARY BITCH 101

19 hours ago
295 notes

"A cop is far more likely… to kill you than you are to kill a cop… The idea that police have an incredibly dangerous job is what we Southerners call a tall-tale, a stretch of the truth to bolster an ego unwilling to accept mediocrity. Not to take away from what many fair-minded officers do every day, but as those stubborn things called facts would have it, policing is less dangerous than farming, fishing, logging, and trash collecting, as well as six other professions. Now is the time to burst the cop myth and to stop giving them the deference to murder our friends and family in the street.”
— Cops: The Myth of the Most Dangerous Job

"A cop is far more likely… to kill you than you are to kill a cop… The idea that police have an incredibly dangerous job is what we Southerners call a tall-tale, a stretch of the truth to bolster an ego unwilling to accept mediocrity. Not to take away from what many fair-minded officers do every day, but as those stubborn things called facts would have it, policing is less dangerous than farming, fishing, logging, and trash collecting, as well as six other professions. Now is the time to burst the cop myth and to stop giving them the deference to murder our friends and family in the street.”

Cops: The Myth of the Most Dangerous Job

(Source: , via america-wakiewakie)

9 hours ago
347 notes
thepeoplesrecord:

The 1% wants to ban sleeping in cars - it hurts their ‘quality of life’ | The GuardianApril 16, 2014
Across the United States, many local governments are responding to skyrocketing levels of inequality and the now decades-long crisis of homelessness among the very poor … by passing laws making it a crime to sleep in a parked car.
This happened most recently in Palo Alto, in California’s Silicon Valley, where new billionaires are seemingly minted every month – and where 92% of homeless people lack shelter of any kind. Dozens of cities have passed similar anti-homeless laws. The largest of them is Los Angeles, the longtime unofficial “homeless capital of America”, where lawyers are currently defending a similar vehicle-sleeping law before a skeptical federal appellate court. Laws against sleeping on sidewalks or in cars are called “quality of life” laws. But they certainly don’t protect the quality of life of the poor.
To be sure, people living in cars cannot be the best neighbors. Some people are able to acquire old and ugly – but still functioning – recreational vehicles with bathrooms; others do the best they can. These same cities have resisted efforts to provide more public toilet facilities, often on the grounds that this will make their city a “magnet” for homeless people from other cities. As a result, anti-homeless ordinances often spread to adjacent cities, leaving entire regions without public facilities of any kind.
Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere, despite the fact that the great majority of homeless people are trying to survive in the same communities in which they were last housed – and where they still maintain connections. Americans sleeping in their own cars literally have nowhere to go.
Indeed, nearly all homelessness in the US begins with a loss of income and an eviction for nonpayment of rent – a rent set entirely by market forces. The waiting lists are years long for the tiny fraction of housing with government subsidies. And rents have risen dramatically in the past two years, in part because long-time tenants must now compete with the millions of former homeowners who lost their homes in the Great Recession.
The paths from eviction to homelessness follow familiar patterns. For the completely destitute without family or friends able to help, that path leads more or less directly to the streets. For those slightly better off, unemployment and the exhaustion of meager savings – along with the good graces of family and friends – eventually leaves people with only two alternatives: a shelter cot or their old automobile.
However, in places like Los Angeles, the shelters are pretty much always full. Between 2011 and 2013, the number of unsheltered homeless people increased by 67%. In Palo Alto last year, there were 12 shelter beds for 157 homeless individuals. Homeless people in these cities do have choices: they can choose to sleep in a doorway, on a sidewalk, in a park, under a bridge or overpass, or – if they are relatively lucky – in a car. But these cities have ordinances that make all of those choices a criminal offense. The car is the best of bad options, now common enough that local bureaucrats have devised a new, if oxymoronic, term – the “vehicularly housed”.
People sleeping in cars try to find legal, nighttime parking places, where they will be less apparent and arouse the least hostility. But cities like Palo Alto and Los Angeles often forbid parking between 2am and 5am in commercial areas, where police write expensive tickets and arrest and impound the vehicles of repeat offenders. That leaves residential areas, where overnight street parking cannot, as a practical matter, be prohibited.
One finds the “vehicularly housed” in virtually every neighborhood, including my own. But the animus that drives anti-homeless laws seems to be greatest in the wealthiest cities, like Palo Alto, which has probably spawned more per-capita fortunes than any city on Earth, and in the more recently gentrified areas like Los Angeles’ Venice. These places are ruled by majorities of “liberals” who decry, with increasing fervor, the rapid rise in economic inequality. Nationally, 90% of Democrats (and 45% of Republicans) believe the government should act to reduce the rich-poor gap.
It is easy to be opposed to inequality in the abstract. So why are Los Angeles and Palo Alto spending virtually none of their budgets on efforts to provide housing for the very poor and homeless? When the most obvious evidence of inequality parks on their street, it appears, even liberals would rather just call the police. The word from the car: if you’re not going to do anything to help, please don’t make things worse.

thepeoplesrecord:

The 1% wants to ban sleeping in cars - it hurts their ‘quality of life’ | The Guardian
April 16, 2014

Across the United States, many local governments are responding to skyrocketing levels of inequality and the now decades-long crisis of homelessness among the very poor … by passing laws making it a crime to sleep in a parked car.

This happened most recently in Palo Alto, in California’s Silicon Valley, where new billionaires are seemingly minted every month – and where 92% of homeless people lack shelter of any kind. Dozens of cities have passed similar anti-homeless laws. The largest of them is Los Angeles, the longtime unofficial “homeless capital of America”, where lawyers are currently defending a similar vehicle-sleeping law before a skeptical federal appellate court. Laws against sleeping on sidewalks or in cars are called “quality of life” laws. But they certainly don’t protect the quality of life of the poor.

To be sure, people living in cars cannot be the best neighbors. Some people are able to acquire old and ugly – but still functioning – recreational vehicles with bathrooms; others do the best they can. These same cities have resisted efforts to provide more public toilet facilities, often on the grounds that this will make their city a “magnet” for homeless people from other cities. As a result, anti-homeless ordinances often spread to adjacent cities, leaving entire regions without public facilities of any kind.

Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere, despite the fact that the great majority of homeless people are trying to survive in the same communities in which they were last housed – and where they still maintain connections. Americans sleeping in their own cars literally have nowhere to go.

Indeed, nearly all homelessness in the US begins with a loss of income and an eviction for nonpayment of rent – a rent set entirely by market forces. The waiting lists are years long for the tiny fraction of housing with government subsidies. And rents have risen dramatically in the past two years, in part because long-time tenants must now compete with the millions of former homeowners who lost their homes in the Great Recession.

The paths from eviction to homelessness follow familiar patterns. For the completely destitute without family or friends able to help, that path leads more or less directly to the streets. For those slightly better off, unemployment and the exhaustion of meager savings – along with the good graces of family and friends – eventually leaves people with only two alternatives: a shelter cot or their old automobile.

However, in places like Los Angeles, the shelters are pretty much always full. Between 2011 and 2013, the number of unsheltered homeless people increased by 67%. In Palo Alto last year, there were 12 shelter beds for 157 homeless individuals. Homeless people in these cities do have choices: they can choose to sleep in a doorway, on a sidewalk, in a park, under a bridge or overpass, or – if they are relatively lucky – in a car. But these cities have ordinances that make all of those choices a criminal offense. The car is the best of bad options, now common enough that local bureaucrats have devised a new, if oxymoronic, term – the “vehicularly housed”.

People sleeping in cars try to find legal, nighttime parking places, where they will be less apparent and arouse the least hostility. But cities like Palo Alto and Los Angeles often forbid parking between 2am and 5am in commercial areas, where police write expensive tickets and arrest and impound the vehicles of repeat offenders. That leaves residential areas, where overnight street parking cannot, as a practical matter, be prohibited.

One finds the “vehicularly housed” in virtually every neighborhood, including my own. But the animus that drives anti-homeless laws seems to be greatest in the wealthiest cities, like Palo Alto, which has probably spawned more per-capita fortunes than any city on Earth, and in the more recently gentrified areas like Los Angeles’ Venice. These places are ruled by majorities of “liberals” who decry, with increasing fervor, the rapid rise in economic inequality. Nationally, 90% of Democrats (and 45% of Republicans) believe the government should act to reduce the rich-poor gap.

It is easy to be opposed to inequality in the abstract. So why are Los Angeles and Palo Alto spending virtually none of their budgets on efforts to provide housing for the very poor and homeless? When the most obvious evidence of inequality parks on their street, it appears, even liberals would rather just call the police. The word from the car: if you’re not going to do anything to help, please don’t make things worse.

(via america-wakiewakie)

9 hours ago
3,228 notes

disciplesofmalcolm:

Malcolm X: “We’re going to have to go to war against the racists.”

(via america-wakiewakie)

9 hours ago
101 notes

america-wakiewakie:

Police Are Testing a “Live Google Earth” To Watch Crime As It Happens | Gizmodo

In Compton last year, police began quietly testing a system that allowed them to do something incredible: Watch every car and person in real time as they ebbed and flowed around the city. Every assault, every purse snatched, every car speeding away was on record—all thanks to an Ohio company that monitors cities from the air.

The Center for Investigative Reporting takes a look at a number of emerging surveillance technologies in a new video, but one in particular stands out: A wide-area surveillance system invented by Ross McNutt, a retired Air Force veteran who owns a company called Persistent Surveillance Systems.

McNutt describes his product as “a live version of Google Earth, only with TiVo capabilities,” which is intriguing but vague (and also sounds a lot like the plot of this terrible Denzel movie). More specifically, PSS outfits planes with an array of super high-resolution cameras that allow a pilot to record a 25-square-mile patch of Earth constantly—for up to six hours.

It’s sort of similar to what your average satellite can do—except, in this case, you can rewind the video, zoom in, and follow specific people and cars as they move around the grid. It’s not specific enough to ID people by face, but, when used in unison with stoplight cameras and other on-the-ground video sources, it can identify suspects as they leave the scene of a crime.

The PSS system has been tested in cities including Baltimore and Dayton, and, last year, police officers in Compton used it to track crimes, including a necklace snatching. In one case, they could track a criminal as he approached a woman, grabbed her jewelry, and then ran to a getaway car. They eventually drove out of frame, which meant they weren’t caught—but, as the Compton police explain in this video, the system told them that this particular car was involved, at the very least.

Plenty of critics argue the technology is an ominous invasion of privacy: Video surveillance free of any traditional technological barriers, tracking everyone and everything that moves in a city. But according to police and its creators, it’s not as invasive as other systems, because it can’t see into homes or identify faces. It “allows us to provide more security with less loss of privacy than any of the other options that are out there,” says one officer. That’s definitely one way to look at it. 

(via america-wakiewakie)

9 hours ago
193 notes

Good Evening Ladies & Gents :) :) I hope today was a blessed one for all of you.

10 hours ago
0 notes

wikihow:

Here is how this is gonna work: it’s Wednesday; at the end of the workday you’re over the hump, so head out now, get some tequila and a watermelon and make some poptails for the moment that 5pm rolls around. Your entire office will love you, and then you’ll get a promotion. …all for making spiked watermelon poptails. On a Wednesday. 

Good plan? Ready, Set, Go!
http://www.wikihow.com/Spike-Watermelon-Poptails

10 hours ago
315 notes